Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation:

Te Kete Ipurangi
Communities
Schools

Te Kete Ipurangi user options:


New Zealand Curriculum Online navigation

Home

Introducing key competency development

Duration: 05:51

Views: 1263

Download the video clip for FLV player (24 MB)

Video Help

In this digital story, Charles Bisley and Justine McDonald discuss the "learning triangle" model that was designed to build learning power and capacity in students, and embed key competencies into all learning.

This model shows the relationship of the key competencies to each other. We can see that it balances the three different aspects of learning, the personal, interpersonal and the cognitive (things to do with literacy).

Justine McDonald, Principle

Kelburn's learning journey

Track Kelburn Normal School's journey through this comprehensive learning story, with templates and examples of their work.

Transcript

When we opened the new curriculum what we noticed was very different about it was the key competencies.  We came up with a model of how the key competencies would change learning at Kelburn School. What was behind them? We thought they were a wonderful way of coordinating the curriculum and the nature of the learner and the processes of learning. We then asked how can we take this model into the classroom to be used by children every day. And we came up with the learning triangle. 

What is behind this model of the key competencies is the idea that you will have talk and relationships in the classroom that will empower learning. This model shows the relationship of the key competencies to each other. We can see that it balances the three different aspects of learning, the personal, interpersonal and the cognitive (things to do with literacy). 

We use the triangle to form the basis or framework for the school to build learning power and capacity with the students. The triangle changes shape depending on where the focus is for that term or year. The whole idea is that it shows everything is intertwined and happening all at once. In order to make it manageable for the teachers we have identified three major components: learning conversations, action research, and using split screen thinking as a method for teachers to think through planning and embed into lessons. It means everything in the triangle is happening at once.

The appraisal system was revised this year to link in the learning conversations, action research and split screen thinking. The appraisals were labelled by the teachers as learning conversations, and this allowed the principal to sit down one on one and see where the teacher’s understanding was with theory and where they were on the continuum of translating that theory into practice. 

“When we did our appraisals it was like a learning conversation because we set goals and Justine came and watched the lesson I took and went round and talked with the children about how they felt. It definitely wasn’t a one off showcase lesson, it was more delving into how those key competencies and learning conversations were used all the way through the rest of the programme”

Rachael Laming, year 7/8 teacher.

One of the things that really inspired us was looking at NZ models and teachers who had been inspiring. We wanted to look at the rich teacher lore that came from our own teachers. Teachers in our own school were important to us, and also the fore runners like Elwin Richardson and Sylvia Ashton Warner. And what they said was it all boils down to the teacher being a good conversationalist and being able to give and empower that conversation for students. If you look at the way our students talk and listen to each other they will reflect on the value of that learning conversation “it’s because I gained new perspectives on my own learning that weren’t my own and that gave me new ways to approach my learning.” The key competencies are all about learning for life. 


Updated on: 24 Feb 2010


Footer: