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Financial capability and the NZ Curriculum

Views: 1500

Robyn Scott (Education Manager, Commission for Financial Capability), Pushpa Wood (Director, Financial Education and Research Centre, Massey University), and Terry Shubkin (CEO, Young Enterprise Trust) explain that financial education is an important part of The New Zealand Curriculum because it affects every single New Zealander. By teaching students about money and making sensible financial decisions, we can prepare them to contribute to our society and our economy in a meaningful way. 

Professional learning conversations

These questions and suggested actions encourage you to reflect on your own school context.

In this interview, Robyn Scott states that:

"Financial education is a really important part of The New Zealand Curriculum, because what we’re all about is future proofing young people to equip them with the skills and capability to live in the world that they’re living in now."

Consider this statement in your own school context. As a school, where are you at now? How could you get to a place where your school environment effectively supports independent financial thinkers? 

Have you seen ...

How curriculum levels relate to years at school.

Financial Capability Progressions (Word 2007, 81 KB)
The financial capability progressions contain suggested curriculum based learning outcomes across a range of learning areas.

Transcript

Robyn Scott

Financial education is a really important part of the New Zealand Curriculum, because what we’re all about is future proofing young people to equip them with the skills and capability to live in the world that they’re living in now. So it’s really, really important that schools and the New Zealand Curriculum reflects the world that our young people are growing up in, and that is one with invisible money and access to credit and debt at a much younger age than perhaps in previous generations. So really tooling kids up to know and understand what all that is all about is really important.

Terry Shubkin

Financial capability is a really important part of the school curriculum because it affects every single New Zealander. The decisions you make relate to every aspect of your life, whether you are a five year old saving up for some lollies, a 16 year old saving up for your car, or a 30 year old saving up for your first mortgage.

Pushpa Wood

We need to actually make children, from a very young age, aware of what money is, and what is the role of money in their day-to-day life, and in their future, and how should they manage that money. The conversation about money is started at home, taught at school, revisited at tertiary sector, and again reconfirmed in employment sector.

If we’re looking at preparing a generation that is going to get out of our school system, who is going to be contributing to a society in a meaningful way, who is going to be contributing to our economy in a meaningful way, and who are going to be not only national citizens but world citizens, then we need to prepare them in a holistic way, and money is part of that whole of life approach, and the whole of life experience. Therefore, it has got a natural place in the school system.


Published on: 25 Nov 2013


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