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Teaching as inquiry.

The most powerful professional development for teachers involves them in an inquiry and knowledge-building cycle, that:

  • identifies students’ needs
  • develops the skills and knowledge teachers require to meet those needs
  • determines if changes in teaching practice have achieved the desired outcomes and therefore been effective.

Teacher Professional Learning and Development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration (2007)

Now it is time to reflect and redirect.

What has been the impact of this inquiry on:

  • the students in your classroom?
  • school-wide policy and practice?
  • other students in the school?
  • other learning areas?
  • the implementation of new or different practices?
  • student agency and involvement?
  • PLD?

Move into a new phase of inquiry by:

  • Identifying new questions, concerns and issues to explore
  • Suggesting possible new outcomes for student learning
  • Writing an action plan for your next inquiry
  • Reflecting on the process with your students 

To challenge your thinking

Inquiry – a much abused word
In this article, Dr Linda Bendikson, Director of The University of Auckland Centre for Educational Leadership, describes her vision for inquiry, and why she has some reservations about how some schools carry it out.

Where to next?

The inquiry process doesn't need to stop because change has occurred, or the school year has ended. Time to look at another aspect of student engagement, collect evidence about achievement, and inquire again.

Published on: 06 Nov 2015


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